We live in a "SMART AGE"

If you rewind back the events that occurred yesterday from the time you woke up until the time you went to sleep: You opened your eyes on the ring of your "Smart" alarm, you drank your coffee prepared by your "Smart" coffee machine. You went to office with your "Smart" car having a "Smart" GPS system, you worked all day on your "Smart" computer, you called your customers using your "Smart" phone, then came back home to relax and watch your favorite show on your "Smart" TV, and suddenly fell asleep on your "Smart" lazy chair! We live in a Smart Age for sure, but did any of these "Smart" technologies save you any money?

With every sunrise and every dawn, we wake up on hundreds and thousands of developments and inventions around the world. The daily progress and findings achieved in one day worldwide in all fields is so fast and vast that non of us can even read or know about, so how come to adopt?! Even if we learn and adopt few, are all these inventions really "Smart"? and do they apply equally to all individuals? What's more important, do they save us any money or just make us consume more?

 

 

SMART NEWS

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

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