HOME AUTOMATION

 

One of our catchiest solutions for residential applications is the state-of-the-art home automation system. This system allows users to connect and control all the house outlets and components from one tablet or even remotely via their smart phones. The user can put his imagination into reality by easily programming his conditional commands on the friendly graphical user interface supplied with the system. Unlimited scenarios can be set to control the lights, alarms, AV systems, blind shutters, washing machine, etc.  For example one could set up the following commands:

 - When I come back home, turn on the corridor lights, also turn on my sound system on a low volume on a specific track, and start the coffee machine.

- Automatically ring the doorbell when a visitor approaches the door, then snap a picture of the visitor and send it directly to my smart phone.

- Turn off the heating system once the window is sensed open, and close the blind shutters.

 What is crucial to mention is that our system can be adopted by any existing house, without worrying about any physical infrastructure works to be done for installation. This is because our system and sensors all speak the wireless Z-Wave language allowing communication to occur wirelessly without the need of wires, making it a perfect solution for retrofit applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SMART NEWS

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

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