Balancing Valves

If we take a look at the overall energy split pie chart for most sites, we can easily notice that the HVAC is the most consuming sector among all other energy sectors! Having an efficient HVAC system does not merely depend on installing efficient chillers and boilers. Balancing the pressurized closed loop circuits that connect these boilers or chillers to the end-user rooms is the master parameter for having HVAC efficiency really put in practice.

 Usually, these closed loops are initially pressurized to an average optimal bar and flow level. The cold or hot fluid exit the chiller or boiler to the radiators or fan coil units in end-user rooms. Inside these rooms the actuators and room thermostats open and close the heating and cooling units as per the user's requirements. This unpredictable and random opening and closing of the fan coil units and radiators creates severe energy inefficiencies due to fluctuations in the set bar and flow levels in the closed-loop circuits.

 Even if some HVAC systems embed traditional balancing valves for pressure and flow control, it is always a dilemma to control the flow without affecting the pressure. The maximum authority of valves in traditional systems is 50%. To overcome this problem, Smart Age offers Combined PIBCV Pressure Independent Balancing and flow Control Valve giving the designer 100% authority hence maximum efficiency! With these valves, exhaustive flow and pressure calculations are not needed anymore, since no matter what how the flows are changed, the differential pressure among the valves remain constant!

  


 

Actuators and room controls

Considered as basic accessories for heating and chilling activities, Smart Age offers a wide range high quality of zone valves, three way valves, actuators, room controls and thermostats, etc... to meet the requirements of new sites as well as existing facilities that wish to invest in top-notch control systems.

 


  

Radiator Reflectors

Although widely used, heating radiators are considered as heavy energy consumers and suffer from many inefficiencies and drawbacks that are worth targeting. One chronic problem is that radiators are considered as hot spots, because they heat up the room in one corner while the rest of the room may feel colder. Also, the radiator elements hung on the wall produce heat in all directions, making 40% of the produced heat go into the wall behind it where it is simply lost. With our "Heatkeeper" reflectors placed behind the radiators, all the heat that was going in the wall is reflected back into the room, making the ambience heat faster and feel more comfy. This great yet low cost solution can reduce fuel consumption used for radiator heating by up to 20%.

 


 

Thermostatic Radiator Valves

A chronic problem we suffer from with our radiators is the overheating that may occur in some rooms or areas of the radiator-installed site. When we turn on the boiler, the radiators will start exchanging heat with the room environment and will continue to heat up the room even if the latter reached the desired temperature. This causes discomfort for the habitants, who may not be able to turn off the boiler because other rooms may still be cold or have not reached the desired temperature.

For this problem we introduce our Smart Radiator Valves. With these valves installed each and every radiator now is programmed to work in only specific times, and heat up a room to the desired temperature only. The radiator valve will automatically switch off the radiator once the requested temperature is reached, and then turn it on again once the room temperature drops from the set value. Just as an example, imagine your bathroom radiator turns on automatically from 7:00 to 8:00 am only with a set temperature of 25°C, and your living room radiator works from 5:00 to 8:00 pm, and your bedroom from 8:00 to 10:00 pm on 21°C temperature, then overnight maintains an 18°C since you will be covered with your blanket... On top of all the ergonomics offered by this solution, the fuel savings can reach 50%!

 


 

Heat Exchangers

Heat exchanger is an inevitable product in any medium to large construction that uses central heating systems. It is also used in several solar applications to transfer the heat efficiently from one systems to another. Besides correct sizing and dimensioning, the quality and technology behind a heat exchanger is the major pillar of its efficiency. Smart Age offers the revolutionary Micro Plate Heat Exchangers characterized by their unique plate pattern, to guarantee an unbeatable efficiency, lowest differential pressure, and longest product lift time.

 


 

Floor heating

The challenges of maintaining a high ergonomic standard in modern living is increasing day by day. With correct design and control, floor heating can meet these requirements and yet be rated as an efficient ambient heating technology.

Having the heat coming homogeneously from underneath the floor in a room, this can make it the most enjoyable and comfy heating source only if it is well designed, installed, and controlled. Smart Age offers all components and accessories required for floor heating projects, including topnotch wireless control platforms for uncompromised performance. 

 

 


 

Heat Pumps

When you think about cooling a hot building or vice versa, it's likely that Air-condition and boiler are the first things that come up to our mind. But when we take energy efficiency into consideration, we find out that the heat pump is a way much better option for both heating and cooling. Simply put, a heat pump is a device that uses a small amount of energy to move heat from one location to another. Heat pumps are typically used to pull heat out of the air or ground to heat a home or office building, but they can be reversed to for cooling activity. Heat pumps also work extremely efficiently, because they simply transfer heat, rather than burn fuel to create it. This makes them up to 50% more efficient than normal HVAC systems.

Smart Age heat pump range supports 72 pre-defined applications with capacity from 4kW to 42kW. The unique self-commissioning flow adjustment and electric element make the installation process ‘plug-and-play’, and give these units a marvelous advantage of up to 75% energy saving possibility.  

 


 

Boiler components

Since the boiler involves physical fuel burning activities, the harsh boiling residues build up inside the system and causes a degradation in its performance and energy efficiency over time. Keeping this in mind, Smart Age offers a wide range of boiler replacement accessories to always give your boiler an adequate facelift, hence preserving its claimed energy rating once brand new. As an example, cleaning and servicing of the oil-fired

boiler will improve fuel economy by 4% when just 1 mm of soot in the boiler is removed!

 

 

 

SMART NEWS

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

The Middle Eastern kingdom targets 41 GW of solar power by 2032 as it seeks to free up more of its abundant oil and gas reserves for lucrative export.

India, the world’s third-largest polluter, will spend at least $100 billion on climate-related projects but is not ready to follow China and the U.S., the top two emitters, in promising to limit its fossil-fuel emissions.

Japan’s trade ministry is setting stricter rules for production and sales of renewable energy in what it says is a drive to speed up development of projects and ensure stable power supply.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to restrict the amount of carbon dioxide released from power plants. The rule calls for reducing carbon 30 percent by 2030 over 2005 levels.

The World Bank has approved its largest-ever financing of a project in Lebanon, a $474 million water supply development scheme aimed at addressing severe shortages faced by over half of the country’s population.

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